Transparency Report Update

We’re pleased to release our second, biannual transparency report and even more excited to announce a few new additions to the report.

In addition to updates to the data we provided on user information requests and government takedown demands in our inaugural report, our latest report includes:

  • Data about the intellectual property related complaints we received and how we responded.
  • Summary pages for each type of request we received, with notes on trends we’re seeing in the numbers.
  • A Resources page so you have easy access to our relevant policies, WordPress.com support documents, and third party information.
  • A Hall of Shame where we showcase some of the threats to freedom of speech and expression that we see and resist every day.

Our new intellectual property report includes data on both copyright and trademark complaints against our users. Copyright complaints are the most common. We carefully review the copyright takedown notices sent our way, and we’re proud to say that in the first half of 2014, we rejected 10% of copyright notices as abusive. “Abusive” notices are formally complete (including all of the information required by the DMCA), but are directed at fair use of content, material that isn’t copyrightable, or content the complaining party misrepresents ownership of a copyright. Some of these are highlighted in our Hall of Shame. In addition, we rejected 26% of the notice we received because they were incomplete.

We receive and respond to fewer claims of trademark infringement on WordPress.com. In this six month reporting period, we received 122 reports and removed content in response to only 15%.

Looking at trends in our data for government information requests and takedown demands: we saw increased volume across the board. We saw a 194% increase in government takedown demands and a 108% increase in government information requests. For the 2014 reporting period, we complied with 5% of the total takedown demands we received, and 16% of the information requests.

Russia again submitted the most takedown demands (35) of any country. Meanwhile, the United States continues to hold the lead in the number of information requests (17), most of which came in the form of a subpoena.

Information Requests

Information Requests Chart

Takedown Demands

Takedown_Requests_Chart

We received no National Security Requests during the first half of 2014, and remain unsatisfied with the level of detail that we’re allowed to report for our previous reporting period.

For a closer look at the data, check out each report in detail by navigating the menu at the top of the page.